ANNUAL HOLLINGWORTH CONFERENCE

 

The Many Faces of

Highly Gifted Children:

Celebrating Their Diversity &

Creating Successful Strategies

For Education and Support

 

PROGRAM

 

May 5 - 7, 2000

Newton, Massachusetts

Sponsored by

The Hollingworth Center for Highly Gifted Children


WELCOME

 

Welcome to our thirteenth annual Hollingworth Conference.  Our goal is to provide an environment where parents and their highly gifted children, educators and mental health professionals can come together to: 1) foster an understanding of the special needs of highly gifted people within the educational community and within society-at-large; 2) facilitate communication between the families of highly gifted children; 3) support highly gifted children and their families by linking them with appropriate services and resources; and 4) offer adult programming, which addresses exemplary practices and strategies for educating,  counseling, and parenting highly gifted children

We have developed a full schedule of workshops and activities from which you may choose.  Each session has been carefully planned, but if you select one that is not what you anticipated, it is acceptable to quietly get up and leave.  We don’t mind at all.  This conference has been designed to meet your needs, and you are the best judge of determining that.      

  Children’s workshops begin 5 minutes earlier and end 5 minutes later than the adult sessions, so parents have time to escort their children to the correct rooms and pick them up afterward.  Children need to be picked up in a timely manner.  The hotel is a busy place, so please make certain that you know where your children are at all times.

 

CHILDREN’S SESSIONS 

SALONS A, B, C, AND H

SALON A WILL HOLD SESSIONS FOR CHILDREN 6 - 9 YEARS OLD

SALON C WILL HOLD SESSIONS FOR CHILDREN 10 - 12 YEARS OLD.

SALON H WILL HOLD MULTI-AGE SESSIONS.

 

Children’s Sessions are discovery based learning workshops for children age six (6) and older.  Parents are welcome to sign their children into the game room during a session and will need to pick them up from the game room at the end of each session.  Parents must remain on the premises during children’s participation in this program.  Children’s sessions begin five minutes earlier and end 5 minutes after adult sessions to allow parents to assist their children in getting from one place to another. 

 

SALON B will be open, supervised, and unscheduled, but stocked with games, books and art supplies all day. 

 

YOUNG ADULT WORKSHOPS

ALL YOUNG ADULT WORKSHOPS WILL BE HELD IN SUITE 639

 

Young Adult Workshops are intended for those people 13ish to 30ish, who wish to address issues of their own giftedness.  Young Adult Workshops are interactive dialogue sessions with presenters on age-relevant topics.  Participants are welcome regardless of documentation/knowledge of which category of giftedness you would fall into, or how much you liked or disliked your childhood social and academic experiences.  Specific age is not terribly relevant; we will limit discussions to management of ones own giftedness and not that of any third party you might be responsible for.  We do ask that anyone above the upper end of the age range consider their effect on the participation of the younger participants and restrict themselves accordingly.  

 

SILENT AUCTION ITEMS DISPLAYED IN SALON D

 

Please stop by the Silent Auction area during the conference and check out these wonderful items!  To make a bid, you write your name and the dollar amount on the bid sheet attached to the item you want.  Bidding closes at noon Sunday, May 7; you stop by the Silent Auction area to claim, pay for, and collect any items for which you are the high bidder.


 

The Hollingworth Center gratefully acknowledges donations to the Silent Auction made by the following businesses and professionals: 

ITEM

DONOR

Fermat=s Last Theorem   teeshirts

PROMYS, Boston University

10 copies Educational Opportunities 2000

Duke University TIP (Joy Baldwin)

2 Kite Mosaiks, 1 Rombix Jr.,1 Mini‑Iamond Ring, felt pad for puzzles

Kadon Enterprises

1 book  Calculus by and for young people

1 book  Calculus by and for young people - worksheets

1 CD Rom "Calculus by and for young people"worksheets

1 Video "Infinite Series by & for young people ages 6&up

1 Video "Iteration to Infinite sequences with 6 ‑ 11y.o.s"

1 poster, "A Map to calculus"

1 book Changing Shapes with Matrices

Don the Mathman

(Don Cohen)

2 Rogers' Connection  (1 Glow‑in‑the‑Dark)

2 Tesengritoys  (1 all put together for display)

 Design Science Toys

Once upon a mind: the stories and scholars of gifted child education

Jim DeLisle

Gifted children at Home: A Practical guide for homeschooling families

Experiences in chemistry (Chemistry 1, CHP Secondary Science Series)

Aviation (one week off unit studies)

Space Exploration (one week off unit studies)

Kathleen Julicher

Guiding the Gifted Child

Smart Girls: a New Psychology of Girls, Women, and Giftedness

Understanding those who create

Gifted Children and the Law: Mediation, due process, and court cases

Gifted children and legal issues: parents' stories of hope

Gifted children and legal issues: an update

Gifted Psychology Press

(Jim Webb)

How Rude

Bullies are a pain in the brain

The gifted child's survival guide from ages 10 & under

Challenging projects for creative minds, grades 1‑5

Free Spirit Press

(Judy Galbraith)

Smithsonian Crystal Radio Kit

The Learning Shop, Madison, WI

Scientific Explorer Electronic Room Alarm Kit

Mindsparks, Madison, WI

2 dozen pairs of actually comfortable socks!

Lynn Grunenwald

Corporate Giving, Lands' End, Inc.

6 SET games and 6 Quiddler games

3 purple adult medium teeshirts, with SET Logo

The SET Game Company http://www.setgame.com/

Mathy Teeshirts ("Da proof is in da pi")

Mathias Mathy

http://www.connecticutsbest.com/mathiasmathy/product.htm

Individual members and friends have been very generous;

here is a selection of items donated to the Silent Auction:

ITEM

ITEM

Cheetah silk scarf

Bracelet with cheetahs

Cheetah design blank journal

Bracelet with an ARK motif

7 AFar Side@ mugs

 Encyclopedia of Astronomy

Woe is I & other assorted books

picture book Fly, Eagle, Fly

Chemistry & other textbooks

autographed Brian Jacque's The Legend of Luke

Leta Hollingworth=s Psychology of Adolescence

Doonesbury Screen Saver

Leta Hollingworth's Children Above180 IQ

Calculus cards

Leta Hollingworth Rare First Edition!

Gifted Children: Their Nature and Nurture

One hour a week of MathGuy=s time (email contact) from May to mid-August, 2000. Resume available!

Five sweatshirts, ARK design in women's sizes S/M/L:

blue/green, gold, purple, ivory, brick red--

Raising Your Spirited Child, Raising  Your Spirited Child Workbook, [Mary S Kurcinka]

Cheetah print

The Homeschooling Book of Answers [Julicher]

Cheetah car mats

Cheetah jigsaws


Some of the individual donors include:  Laura Dunbar, Mike Robinson, Kathi Kearney, Brenda Lessor, Josh Shaine, Hilary Cohen, Jill Howard, Laura Andersen, & Sherry Pence.  There are other

Generous people who are donating items, but we didn’t have all the names at press time.

 

Thank you all!


 

EXHIBITORS - SALON D  

 

Be sure to visit the Exhibitors in Salon D throughout the conference.

 

BOOK SIGNING

 

Stephanie Tolan has generously offered to do a book signing for us.  We will have the following books have been made available from her publisher, Harper Collins:  Face in the Mirror, Good Courage, Ordinary Miracles, Plague Years, Who’s There; Welcome to the Ark

 

A SPECIAL THANK YOU TO:

 

Tonya Andersen for coordinating the Children’s Program and

Anna Herbert for coordinating the Young Adult Sessions

 

ANNUAL MEETING

THE HOLLINGWORTH CENTER FOR HIGHLY GIFTED CHILDREN

Sunday, May 7, 2000, 4:00 P.M. -  5:15 p.m. 

 

   We invite you to join us at the annual meeting of the Hollingworth Center on Sunday, May 7, at 4:00 – 5:15 p.m. in Salon E.  The meeting will include an update on Hollingworth Center activities, finances, a discussion regarding future directions, and an election of board members.

 

FRIDAY SESSIONS

 

REGISTRATION 8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.

 

8:30 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.

 

INTRODUCTION

 

Wake Up America!  Your Highly Gifted Students are Fleeing Public Schools

 

Christine Neville, Ed.D.

 

   Who is fleeing?  Why are they jumping ship?  To what alternatives are they going?  Can and should anything be done about it?

   Dr. Christine Neville is Head of School, Schilling School for Gifted Children, Cincinnati, Ohio, and a Board Member of The Hollingworth Center for Highly Gifted Children, founder of the Program for the Exceptionally Gifted at Mary Baldwin College, an active advocate for the highly gifted students. 

 

9:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

 

Serving Profoundly Gifted Students In The Schools –

The Optimal Match Philosophy In Action

 

James Davis, M.A.

 

   Highly and profoundly gifted children are greatly underserved in America’s schools.  Evidence of this is the rising number of these students whose parents are choosing to home school them to better meet their exceptional and individual needs.  Highly and profoundly gifted students need a different approach to education.  Schools need to move away from a one-size-fits-all approach to one that is more specifically tailored to the specific intellectual, social and emotional needs of this group of young people.  The Optimal Match is based on the principle that individuals differ from one another and that these differences should be recognized and respected.  The Optimal Match philosophy provides a theoretical framework around which we can build model instructional programs for the highly and profoundly gifted. 

    James Davis, M.A. serves as Director of External Relations, Institute for Educational Advancement, a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting our nation’s most talented young people to identify and develop their fullest potential.  Mr. Davis has 28 years experience as an educator and most recently as Superintendent of the La Canada Unified School District, Southern California.

 

College Integrated Science for Highly Gifted High School Students

and Teach Mathematics NOT Arithmetic

 

Douglas G. Frank, Ph.D.

 

   Biology, Physics and Chemistry are taught in an integrated manner, each year building on the previous.  Current research, weekly labs, and literature by eminent thinkers are all employed in a fast paced, exciting immersion in science.

   The unfortunate teaching of arithmetic to highly and profoundly gifted children can repress or extinguish natural mathematical ability.  When children reach middle and high school grades after a steady diet of arithmetic, there is a huge amount of unlearning and relearning to be accomplished.  Brilliant math students sometimes even believe that they cannot do math because they have never experienced it.

   Dr. Douglas G. Frank teaches science and mathematics at The Schilling School for Gifted Children in Cincinnati, Ohio and President of ADAM Instrument Company.

 

The Critical Peer Group: Critical Needs for Depth in Literature and Writing

 

Christine Neville, Ed.D. and Stephanie Tolan, Author

 

   Is the intellectual peer group as important as, or even more important than, the academic challenge?  This session presents the absolute need for highly gifted children to feel normal in their own skin, and to understand who they are while in the presence of other intellectual peers who have similar interests and abilities.  These students need their social/emotional needs met as they are immersed in learning that is specifically designed to meet their intellectual needs.  Attention must be given to both head and heart in order for them to develop their incredible strengths!

   Dr. Christine Neville is Head of School, Schilling School for Gifted Children, Cincinnati, Ohio, and a Board Member of The Hollingworth Center for Highly Gifted Children, and founder of the Program for the Exceptionally Gifted at Mary Baldwin College.  She continues to be an advocate for the highly gifted.

   Stephanie Tolan is an award-winning author of novels and plays for children and young adults.  She also writes and speaks about the needs of the gifted.  Co-author of Guiding the Gifted Child, a contributing editor of Roeper Review, past columnist for Understanding Our Gifted, and a consultant to parents of highly gifted children.

 

Current Best Practices In Highly Gifted Pedagogy

 

Beverly Quilty-Dunn, M.A.

 

   This workshop covers current best practices for helping gifted students maximize individual potential.  Current research will be presented. including a wide variety of strategies and techniques to help teachers better understand and meet the needs of these asynchronous learners.  Participants will have an opportunity to learn about methods, materials, and techniques successfully used in grades K-8 classrooms.  Independent study techniques will be shared, as well as re-assessment techniques, curriculum compacting, and differentiation of instruction and curriculum.  We’ll look at instructional strategies that invite teachers to create classrooms responsive to learner need.  How to handle related classroom and student management issues will also be discussed, as well as developing differentiated curriculum via a tiered approach. 

   Beverly Quilty-Dunn, M.A., is current Department Head for the Plymouth, MA, public schools Gifted and Talented Program.  She is also current Chairperson of G & T Advisory Council for the MA Dept. of Education, current Vice President of Directors of the MA Association for the Advancement of Individual Potential (MA/AIP), and an educational consultant for numerous Massachusetts towns.

 

LUNCH 11:45 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. – CHARLES RIVER EAST ROOM

                       

AFTERNOON  1:00 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.

 

 

 

 

TWO SESSIONS:  1ST:  Open Doors to Education

 

Elizabeth and Justin Chapman

 

   Find out how all students can gain access to an appropriate education.  The answer is simple - eliminate age discrimination.  With schools forced to look at a student’s abilities, rather than their birth dates, schools will start to see students as unique individuals whose gifts are to be cherished.  Testing would have to be done early, to determine proper placement.  Classrooms would have wide ranges of ages leading to a more complete social development.  Standards would increase with higher expectations.  The benefits would be tremendous and at a decreased cost.  Find out more in this action packed lecture.

   Elizabeth Chapman and Justin Chapman are a mother and son team.  Justin was born in July 1993 and attends college full time.  He attended Stanford University Education Program for Gifted Youth and Cambridge Academy.  He completed high school in February 2000.  He enjoys swim team, fencing, Tae Kwon Do, soccer, archery, acting, piano, violin, along with many other interests. 

 

2ND:  Educational Needs of the Profoundly Gifted Child; Practical Ways the School Can Help

 

Jill Howard, J.D. and Michael

 

   Typically, the profoundly gifted child is misunderstood through the early school years.  He may be a behavior problem, or he may be quiet and withdrawn.  He may not earn good grades.  He may be disorganized and absent-minded to the point of driving his teachers and his parents to distraction.  Whatever the exterior facade, he is likely extremely sensitive, self-critical, bored, and depressed.  If a teacher or a school can be brought to recognize the child’s unusual abilities and intensities, the response may be frustrated by a perceived lack of finances or other resources.  The good news is that there are fairly simple ways by which any school system can accommodate the needs of a profoundly gifted child without draining finite resources.  This session will discuss the special needs of the profoundly gifted child and how the educational system can meet those needs.

   Jill Howard, J.D. and Michael are mother and son.  Jill graduated from Vanderbilt University School of Law and is presently a child advocate attorney and legal case management consultant for Chesapeake Interlink, Owings Mill, MD.

Highly Gifted:  Multiple Insights From Multiple Perspectives

 

Ellen D. Fiedler, Ph.D. and Bethany Bell, M.A.

 

   Highly gifted youngsters continue to create dilemmas for educators with even the best intentions of providing programs for gifted students.  Meanwhile, parents continue to be baffled by questions of how appropriate educational opportunities might be provided for their children who know so much so soon.  This session will describe an ongoing effort to capture and synthesize insights gained by those who have focused their life work on behalf of the highly gifted.  Current thoughts from selected national leaders who have grappled extensively with these concerns will be shared, as captured in a series of recent videotapes, revealing a wide range of ideas about key issues and what might be done about them.

   Dr. Ellen D. Fiedler is Professor, Master of Arts Program in Gifted Education, Department of Special Education, Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, Illinois.

   Bethany Bell, M.A. holds her Master of Arts in Gifted Education and is a gifted education teacher at the primary level in Northbrook, Illinois. 

 

Black Sky Bright Star:

The Highly Gifted and Depression

 

P. Susan Jackson, M.A., R,C.C.

 

   "And then the black comes rolling in again. . .the thoughts of death. . .and I alone in it. . ."  The results of an extensive research study on the nature, extent and meaning of depressive states for the highly gifted adolescent will be presented. The study revealed a complex set of variables that underpin the development of depressive states differing in type and severity.   Counselors, teachers and parents will be provided with perspectives on appropriate counseling and developmental scaffolding as well as strategies to support highly gifted young people.

   P. Susan Jackson, M.A., R.C.C. is a poet, mother of two exceptional children, a counseling psychologist, teacher, consultant, administrator, and researcher specializing in the developmental, educational and therapeutic needs of gifted persons.  Her particular interest and expertise is the highly gifted population in which she has been immersed in study and practice for ten years. 

 

Twice Special: Gifted Children with Special Needs

 

Panel:  Benjamin Cyr, Kiesa Kay, Annette Revel Sheely, M.A., and Meredith Warshaw

 

 Creative, brilliant thinkers sometimes flounder in traditional school settings.  Many highly gifted children have other special needs: learning disabilities, ADHD, Asperger’s syndrome, or other neurological problems.  These children’s abilities to compensate often mean they don’t receive supports that would enable them to flourish in school and realize their dreams.  Linda Kreger Silverman, director of the Gifted Development Center, has estimated that thirty percent of gifted children have some form of special need.  A highly gifted child with age-level skills in one area is not likely to be identified as having special needs, leading to frustration and distress.  Understanding these learners can challenge even the experienced individual.  This panel discussion will address the important issues of identification, modifications, and support for twice exceptional learners.  This panel includes a twice-special student, mothers, and professionals with experience in a variety of settings.  With support, twice-special students can keep their self-esteem and flourish.

   Benjamin Cyr is a gifted/special needs high school student.

   Kiesa Kay is the mother of two gifted/special needs children and editor of the book Uniquely Gifted.

   Annette Revel Sheely, M.A. does assessments and counseling at the Gifted Development Center in Denver, Colorado, and has a counseling practice in Boulder.

   Meredith Warshaw is the mother of a gifted/special needs child and co-founder/co-listowner of the GT-Special email list for families with gifted/special needs children. 

                       

SATURDAY SESSIONS

 

REGISTRATION 8:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

 

9:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

 

Meeting The Needs Of Exceptionally Gifted Students In And Out Of The Classroom

 

Carol C. Blackburn, Ph.D.

 

   Extremely gifted students differ greatly from same-age peers in cognitive abilities and educational needs.  Even special schools and programs for gifted students are rarely targeted to students achieving several years above grade level.  Extremely gifted students need individualized programs where the level and pace of instruction are appropriate for their specific aptitudes and achievement.  They also need supplemental educational opportunities outside of school.  This presentation will discuss options for meeting the needs of extremely gifted students.  Case studies of highly gifted individuals who have utilized selected options will be presented.

   Dr. Carol C. Blackburn is Senior Research Associate/Counselor with the Center for Talented Youth, John Hopkins University, career counseling specialist for CTY’S Diagnostic and Counseling Center, and author and editor of career and science related articles for Imagine.  She is also editor of Imagine’s college review series.

 

Living With Dual Identities:  A Model For Connected Systems And Supports Needed

By Accelerated Highly And Profoundly Gifted Students

Taking Classes At A Second School Site

 

Sandra Carlton, M.S. and David Currie, M.S.

 

   Attending two schools at the same time, balancing separate workloads, and dealing with two systems of rules can be overwhelming for highly gifted young students, particularly if the two systems are not philosophically, programmatically, and organizationally connected.  Educators at both sites need to connect and streamline operations and data flows, address philosophical differences, and jointly solve logistical problems.  Working together, both schools need to mesh resources and schedules, appropriately place students, and support their unique needs at both sites.  Students need to be involved in decisions and prepared for the experience.  Teachers need information and supports.  The presenters will discuss a year-old project for accelerated learners at Highland Park Junior and Senior Highs, Public School District 625, St. Paul, Minnesota, from parent and educator perspectives.

   Sandra Carlton, M.S.  is with the State of Minnesota, Department of Human Services, Health Care Administration Organization, and is their work force management planner.    

   David Currie, M.S.  is a French teacher with Highland Park Junior High and their gifted and talented specialist.

 

Curriculum Development For The Exceptionally And Profoundly Gifted

 

Carole Ruth Harris, Ed.D.

 

   The exceptionally and profoundly gifted are as different from other gifted children as the gifted are from the average child in the classroom.  The exceptionally and profoundly gifted child who is expected to adjust to a program designed for the mildly to highly gifted experiences severe problems, including frustration, increased stress, low self-esteem, an active attempt to mask abilities, and behavioral and psychological problems.  The presentation details curricular intervention for this population, as derived from broad spectrum profiling, design of individualized curriculum, and school liaison techniques.  Case studies provide examples of outcomes.  Dialogue following the presentation will be directed toward applications to similar cases and their implications for profoundly gifted children.

   Dr. Carole Ruth Harris is Adjunct Professor of Education at Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, and Director of G.A.T.E.S. Research & Evaluation, an independent consulting firm specializing in evaluation, educational counseling, and individualized curriculum design for gifted and talented children. 

 

Understanding Highly And Profoundly Gifted Children: 

A Primer For First-Time Conference Participants

 

Kathi Kearney

 

   Highly gifted and profoundly gifted children include those with extremely high IQs, child prodigies, and children who are very advanced in one particular domain.  It is often difficult for these children to find a good academic fit in contemporary schools, and their families face significant challenges in the home environment.  This introductory session for first-time conference attendees will provide important background information about highly and profoundly gifted children, the major issues surrounding their development, and an introduction to typical educational and family concerns.  Participants will also become familiar with the terminology unique to the study of this population.  An overview of conference sessions will be provided, enabling participants to select the conference sessions most likely to meet their individual needs.

   Kathi Kearney is Founder of the Hollingworth Center for Highly Gifted Children, a volunteer based national resource and support network for extremely gifted children and their families, schools, and communities.  She is an independent educational consultant in gifted education and works with homeschooling families in many capacities.  She is completing her doctorate in Education of the Gifted at Teachers College, Columbia University. 

 

Many Internet Resources For Highly Gifted Children

 

Carolyn J. Kottmeyer

 

   Highly gifted children are just like any other children – some are writers, others readers, some excel in creative pursuits including art or music, others in math or science, or any other area you can name.  Highly gifted children are hardly “all alike.”  But the big difference between highly gifted children and any other children is that highly gifted children are more: more intense, more inquisitive, more interested in the depth and breadth of a subject, going beyond the everyday and ordinary.  Most importantly highly gifted children learn more quickly, and more deeply than other children.  And this presents more challenge for their parents and educators.

   Find out how the Internet can help you deal with these unique and wonderful children.  Through the ever-growing resources of Hoagies’ Gifted Education Page, discover new and exciting information on the intricate life of the highly gifted child.

   Carolyn J. Kottmeyer, B.S. is webmistress for The Hollingworth Center for Highly Gifted Children. A.k.a. Mrs. Hoagie (wife of Hoagie).  She has been a Mainframe programmer for 14 years.  She and her husband are parents of two profoundly gifted children.  She is the Founder and webmistress of Hoagies’ Gifted Education Page www.hoagiesgifted.org and its spin-off, Hoagies’ Kids and Teens Page www.hoagieskids.org

 

How To Bring About State and National Change for the Most Gifted Students

 (Grass Roots Mothers)

 

Leila J. Levi, M.F.A. and Wenda Sheard, Doctoral Student

 

   Leila Levi and Wenda Sheard have been working together structuring a casual but consolidated national effort to bring change within the legal, advocacy, and grass roots movements for highly gifted students. They will walk you through the contact process and writing processes to file a class action suit with the United States Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights, as your first step.  An explanation will be provided about how to contact your legislatures to write a bill to overturn age discrimination language within your State Department of Education.  Many states have specific language in their education codes that denies access to higher level of curriculum based on age.  This is a practical seminar for those thinking about working with others to bring about state and national change for the most gifted students.

   Leila J. Levi, M.F.A. is the mother of the profoundly gifted child who catapulted her into action with our court systems because of his gifts.  This has provided them with a crash course in real-life age discrimination, civil rights actions, media relations, and legal procedure in order for him to get an appropriate education.  Her son says “she’s always reminded me of Rosa Parks.”  She wrote California’s AB 2206 and AB 2207 and has filed the LMC and Similarly Situated Children age discrimination suit on behalf of gifted children.  She worked on the final draft of HR 637. 

   Wenda Sheard is a mother of three gifted children, an Ohio-licensed attorney (inactive), and a doctoral student at the University of North Texas.

 

Beyond The Label

 

Elizabeth Lovance, B. A.

 

   As extremely gifted children, being labeled (or unlabelled) as some “flavor” of gifted often becomes the focus around which we view ourselves and our relationships with others.  This is understandable because our primary task as children and adolescents is to learn, the activity that is most associated with the gifted label.  What happens when this is no longer seen to be our primary task, when we “grow up,” and many expect other identities (work, family, etc.), to become primary? How can we find balance between all these identities and draw strength from our experience of growing up gifted to deal with other situations?  What are the differences between being an extremely gifted adult and being an extremely gifted child?  How can that transition be made smoothly?  This session will focus heavily on discussion.  Young adults and adults are equally encouraged to attend.

   Elizabeth Lovance, B. A. is a database consultant, computer teacher, and the co-founder and moderator of TAGTEENS listserve for gifted youth. 

 

 

Multi-Age, Multi-Level Magnet Programming

For Extremely Highly Gifted Elementary/Middle School Students

 

Linda S. Rivers, Ph.D.

 

   The seeds for this program were planted seven years ago by the Lincoln Public Schools psychologist for the gifted program and a group of parents of IQ 150+ students who were not flourishing in their elementary schools. The one-half day magnet program has been funded by the school system since the original state lottery grant expired. Now in its fifth year, the program has served twenty different students, some for as long as four years.  The presentation outlines program development and changes over the five years; presents data on social-emotional growth; provides case study material on individual students; and suggests a theoretical framework for understanding the social-emotional development of these extremely highly gifted students.

   Dr. Linda S. Rivers is a psychologist working full time in the gifted program of the Lincoln Public Schools, Lincoln, Nebraska.  She conducts a long term group with adolescent gifted females and a coed group for highly gifted tenth graders.

 

KEYNOTE

10:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

                       

From ‘The Saddest Sound’ To The D Major Chord: 

How Radical Acceleration Can Liberate Highly Gifted Students

 

Miraca U. M. Gross, Ph.D.

 

   Although the academic acceleration of gifted and talented students is probably the most comprehensively studied and evaluated of all educational interventions, many teachers are reluctant to accelerate gifted students for fear they will suffer socially or emotionally.  Radical acceleration, which can take several forms and be of enormous benefit to exceptionally and profoundly gifted students, is significantly under-utilized.   Yet research suggests that “the bird that’s tethered to the ground” may be at greater risk of social isolation and emotional maladjustment through inappropriate grade placement with age-peers.

   Highly, exceptionally, and profoundly gifted students differ from their moderately gifted age peers in many aspects of their social and emotional development.  This session explains how well planned programs of acceleration can enhance these students’ self-esteem, love of learning, self-acceptance, and capacity to form warm and supportive friendships.  For many highly gifted students, acceleration replaces discord with harmony.

   The “music” metaphor of the title is from Simon and Garfunkel’s El Condor Pasa; “the bird that’s tethered to the ground – it gives the world its saddest sound.”   The “D Major chord” part comes from a girl who is one of the subjects in my 15-year longitudinal study of children of IQ 160+.   Tessa was desperately lonely and unhappy through her first few years of school until she was allowed to accelerate into a class where there were (not coincidentally) two other highly gifted girls with whom she has formed a deep and lasting friendship.   One day she said to me, eagerly:  “You know, Jacquie and Clare and me  - well, it’s like music!  Each of us is a different note - we’ve each got our own voice and our own qualities - but put us together and it’s like a D major chord!   Something beautiful and better happens.”

   D Major is recognized as the key in which many “joyous” works are written.  Handel wrote many of his great “praising God” oratorio choruses in D Major and while Beethoven wrote his great 9th Symphony in D Minor, for the choral movement, the “song of joy”, he modulated to the tonic major - D Major.  Tessa’s metaphor of her friendship as a chord of music has great power and beauty.

   Dr. Miraca U. M. Gross has won over five international awards for her research in gifted education.  She has over 20 years experience as a classroom teacher and school administrator in State education systems in Scotland and Australia.  For 12 years she was a specialist teacher of gifted and talented children in several different classroom settings.

   

LUNCH 11:45 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.  For those who pre-registered:

Pick up lunches in registration area.

 

SATURDAY 1:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.

 

Open Doors to Education

 

Elizabeth and Justin Chapman

 

   Find out how all students can gain access to an appropriate education.  The answer is simple - eliminate age discrimination.  With schools forced to look at a student’s abilities, rather than their birth dates schools will start to see students as unique individuals whose gifts are to be cherished.

Testing would have to be done early, to determine proper placement.  Classrooms would have wide ranges of ages leading to a more complete social development.  Standards would increase with higher expectations.  The benefits would be tremendous and at a decreased cost.  Find out more in this action packed lecture.

   Elizabeth Chapman and Justin Chapman are a mother and son team.  Justin was born in July 1993 and attends college full time.  He attended Stanford University Education Program for Gifted Youth and Cambridge Academy.  He completed high school in February 2000.  He enjoys swim team, fencing, Tae Kwon Do, soccer, archery, acting, piano, violin, along with many other interests. 

 

College Level Integrated Science For Highly Gifted High School Students

 

Douglas G. Frank, Ph.D.

 

   Biology, Physics and Chemistry are taught in an integrated manner, each year building on the previous.  Current research, weekly labs, and literature by eminent thinkers are all employed in a fast paced, exciting immersion in science.

   Dr. Douglas G. Frank is the Science and Mathematics Teacher at The Schilling School for Gifted Children in Cincinnati, Ohio and President of ADAM Instrument Company.

 

Educational Needs of the Profoundly Gifted Child; Practical Ways the School Can Help

 

Jill Howard, J.D. and Michael

 

   Typically, the profoundly gifted child is misunderstood through the early school years.  He may be a behavior problem, or he may be quiet and withdrawn.  He may not earn good grades.  He may be disorganized and absent-minded to the point of driving his teachers and his parents to distraction.  Whatever the exterior facade, he is likely extremely sensitive, self-critical, bored, and depressed.   If a teacher or a school can be brought to recognize the child’s unusual abilities and intensities, the response may be frustrated by a perceived lack of finances or other resources.  The good news is that there are fairly simple ways by which any school system can accommodate the needs of a profoundly gifted child without draining finite resources.  This session will discuss the special needs of the profoundly gifted child and how the educational system can meet those needs.

   Jill Howard, J.D. and Michael are mother and son.  Jill graduated from Vanderbilt University School of Law and is presently a child advocate attorney and legal case management consultant for Chesapeake Interlink, Owings Mill, MD.

The "Tech Kids": Who Are They and How Do We Educate Them?

 

Kathleen Julicher

 

   There are children who very early and very systematically begin to take things apart.  They may do it with permission or without, but the appliances still wind up in pieces on the kitchen table.  Eventually, they begin to put the parts back together.  Using the results of a recent survey of tech kids of all ages, the presenter will review some of the most common characteristics of a very uncommon population.  How will you educate your future engineers and inventors?  What comes next after Legos and Robotics kits?  We will explore ideas for planning an appropriate education for exceptionally gifted tech kids

   Kathleen Julicher, and her husband are the founders of Castle Heights Press, publishers of science manuals for home and small school use.  She is also the principal of Westbridge Academy, the only satellite school for gifted homeschoolers. 

 

Highly Gifted Children With AD/HD

 

Deirdre V. Lovecky, Ph.D.

 

   Highly gifted children with AD/HD have a dual exceptionality. Both their AD/HD and their giftedness produce qualitative differences from both the average child and from other gifted children in cognitive, emotional, and social areas. These differences can be seen in the degree of asynchrony shown within areas of development (greater maturity one minute, immaturity the next). Quantitative differences can also be seen, for example, on WISC-III subtest scores. These quantitative and qualitative differences require a different approach in education and treatment. This presentation will provide a framework for understanding the particular strengths and weaknesses of highly gifted children with AD/HD that present a unique challenge in their care and treatment, and will provide some suggestions for enabling them to better make use of their gifts.

   Dr. Deirdre Lovecky has written the article “Gifted Children with AD/HD” which can be accessed through the ERIC Clearing House at http://ericec.org/fact/lovecky.hmt.  She is a clinical child psychologist who specializes in the assessment and treatment of gifted children.  She is especially interested in the needs of exceptionally and profoundly gifted children, those with dual exceptionalities such as AD/HD or Asperger’s Syndrome, and in learning differences.  She has a private practice in Providence, RI.  Her website is www.grcne.com

 

The INFP Type Influences On Highly Gifted People

 

Betty Meckstroth, M. Ed.

 

   Although the Introverted, Intuitive, Feeling, Perceptive personality type is among the most prevalent for gifted people, only about 1% of the U.S. population is this type. Melding rare type and intelligence amplifies the adjustment and acceptance strife many gifted people endure. This session examines the personal qualities and life experiences of INFP gifted people, explores what is necessary and normal for many gifted children and adults, and ways to actualize their Selves and cooperate with others.  We will explore issues such as effects on education, sensitivity, stress, and relationships. We will discuss how highly gifted people tend to be: driven by entelechy; committed to their own destiny; placeing superlative value on their own life; committed to their own integrity; intrinsically motivated from their values and their Self; and living in a large framework.  Participation by attendees is integral

   Betty Meckstroth, M. Ed. has worked with families of gifted children and focused on their social and emotional needs since 1979.  She coordinated development of the Supporting Emotional Needs of Gifted Children and Adults program (SENG).  She is a co-author of Teaching Young Gifted Children in the Regular Classroom and Guiding the Gifted Child:  A Practical Source for Parents and Teachers, awarded “Best Book” by the American Psychological Association and published in four languages. 

 

The Critical Peer Group

 

Christine Neville, Ed.D.

 

   Is the intellectual peer group as important as, or even more important than, the academic challenge?  This session presents the absolute need for highly gifted children to feel normal in their own skin, and to understand who they are while in the presence of other intellectual peers who have similar interests and abilities.  These students need their social/emotional needs met as they are immersed in learning that is specifically designed to meet their intellectual needs.  Attention must be given to both head and heart in order for them to develop their incredible strengths!

   Dr. Christine Neville is Head of School, Schilling School for Gifted Children, Cincinnati, Ohio, and a Board Member of The Hollingworth Center for Highly Gifted Children, and founder of the Program for the Exceptionally Gifted at Mary Baldwin College.  She continues to be an advocate for the highly gifted.

 

The Interaction Of Giftedness & Learning Disorders: 

A Discussion Of Self-Concept & Learning Style

 

Catya Von Károlyi, Ph.D. candidate

 

   Points of intersection between giftedness and learning disorders are considered with emphases on dyslexia and highly gifted children.  A sense of being different from others distinguishes self-concept, both in the highly gifted child and in the child with learning disorders.  The self-concept of the highly gifted child with learning disorders is influenced by the interaction of these exceptionalities. Success is the foundation of self-esteem.  The influence on success of learning style - specifically, holistic versus detail-oriented cognitive style - is discussed, using an example provided by original research on visual-spacial abilities and dyslexia.  Characteristics of successful dyslexics and the facilitory and inhibitory cognitive characteristics of highly gifted children are reviewed.  In the interest of promoting success, and thereby enhancing self-concept, it is recommended that highly gifted children with learning disorders be helped to develop flexible, adaptive, and idiosyncratic cognitive approaches to the various challenges that they face.

   Catya Von Károlyi, Ph.D. candidate is the parent of a profoundly gifted teenager.  She past vice-president, and past member of the Board of Directors for the Hollingworth Center for Highly Gifted Children, as well as the former associate editor of the publication, Highly Gifted Children.  Catya researches cognitive, social, and emotional aspects of giftedness, parenting highly gifted children, and visual-spatial abilities in dyslexia. 

 

SATURDAY 2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

 

Activating Ability Grouping:  Batteries Not Included

 

Carole Ruth Harris, Ed.D.

 

   There is a vast confusion between “tracking” and “ability grouping” in the public mind, and this often works against efforts to build viable programs for the gifted.  Although other types of exceptional children frequently benefit from mainstreaming, the slower learning pace in the average classroom frequently becomes an ordeal for the gifted child.  This presentation outlines research findings and practical applications, along with commonly cited educational concerns.  Discussion and audience participation in the light of reported findings follow the establishment of AAA energizing guidelines:  Activism, Advocacy, Alternatives.  Batteries not included.

   Dr. Carole Ruth Harris is Adjunct Professor of Education at Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, and Director of G.A.T.E.S. Research & Evaluation, an independent consulting firm specializing in evaluation, educational counseling, and individualized curriculum design for gifted and talented children. 

 

The Great Juggling Act: 

Creating the "Perfect" School for the Highly and Profoundly Gifted Student

 

Barbara Mitchell Hutton, MBA

 

   Keeping asynchrony, spiritual giftedness, learning styles, continuous learning, the Columbus Group definition of giftedness, personality types, parent needs, financial pressure and the clogged toilet from crashing to the ground. Is it possible for a school to meet the expectations of parents, students, teachers, administrators, and governing boards? What are some of the tradeoffs?  How close can a school really come to being "perfect" for highly and profoundly gifted children?  Achieving balance for all constituents is an ongoing challenge. Realizing the school's own limitations is an important part of the process. Since 1990, Rocky Mountain School for the Gifted and Creative in Boulder, Colorado has evolved in its understanding of gifted children, their inner lives, and the hopes and fears of parents. Join the Director as we try to build a “model” school in this interactive session for parents, administrators, teachers and counselors.

   Barbara Mitchell Hutton, MBA is Director and co-founder of Rocky Mountain School for the Gifted and Creative in Boulder, Colorado.  She also serves as President of the Board of Directors.  In 1990, motivated by the needs of a two year old highly gifted daughter, Barbara began the process of finding a school that would meet her needs.  When it became clear that existing public and private schools were not prepared to provide a supportive environment for a young gifted girl she laid the groundwork for establishing Rocky Mountain School.

Parent Support Group

 

Nancy Minkoff, M.S. and Shirley Rand

 

   Nancy Minkoff and Shirley Rand will be facilitating parent support group discussions.  Both Nancy and Shirley are parents of profoundly gifted individuals who are now adults, and thus have been through many of the trials involved in the challenge of parenting these children.  Shirley’s son is twice exceptional, providing her with additional expertise and insights.  Parents may come and discuss their own situations in a safe, non-confrontational, understanding environment, and can gain not only from the expertise of Nancy and Shirley, but also from their discussions with each other.  These two parents conducted support groups at last year’s conference and felt a number of parents benefited.

   Nancy Minkoff, M.S. holds degrees in Psychology and Exceptionality.  She is the mother of two adult profoundly gifted children and is a founding member of The Hollingworth Center for Highly Gifted Children.

   Shirley Rand is the Mother of five twice-exceptional children and has developed many skills necessary in dealing with schools, highly gifted children with special needs, and the legislature.  She is a founding member of The Hollingworth Center for Highly Gifted Children.

 

Exploring Individual Capacities Of Highly Gifted Children

 

Karen Morse, M.A.

 

   Parents of gifted children are astute identifiers of giftedness in their children. Highly gifted children face unique challenges requiring specific collaborative efforts of adults. These children  often express insatiable need for precision, creating simplicity from complexity, and complicating simple things. Their eminence permeates everything they do, affecting everyone around them This session provides an awareness of the characteristics of highly gifted children, instructional strategies, and parenting approaches which are critical to strengthening the capacity and contentment of highly gifted children.

   Karen Morse, M.A. is a gifted resource teacher; national, state, and local speaker, and a consultant.  She provides inservice for parents, teachers and administrators on topics of concern in gifted education; includes gifted girls, at-risk and underachieving gifted, gifted preschoolers, enrichment and differentiation, teaching in the gifted and regular classroom, and highly and profoundly gifted.

 

Underachievement Among the Highly Gifted

 

Josh Shaine

 

   “Why won’t you do your homework?!”  “But it’s so easy, if you would just try!”  “You used to love school.  What happened?”  Underachieving children are among the most frustrating problems a parent or teacher can have.  It gets worse when you know that the child is full of untapped potential or that the child formerly did well, but now does not.  In this session, we will explore some of the causes, some potential remedies, and some pro-active strategies for possibly avoiding these issues altogether.

   Josh Shaine has been working with gifted and talented children for more than twenty years.  During that time he has served as Director of MIT’s High School Studies program; Headmaster of Massachusetts Academy, a private school for gifted 7th-12th grade students; and is a teacher/tutor for a variety of families, private schools, and public school systems.  He also serves on the board of the Massachusetts Association for Advancement of Individual Potential and Kids’ College.

 

Socialization In Highly Gifted Children:

Strive To Be “All Around” Or “Keep To Your Own Kind:” 

Are These Seemingly Opposite Social Values Necessarily Incompatible?

 

Deborah Shictman, Ed.D., MSW

 

   In 1942, Leta Hollingworth claimed that one goal of gifted individuals should be to learn how to “suffer fools gladly.”  She was alluding to the difficulty highly gifted children have in establishing satisfactory play and other social relationships with chronological peers.  By examining the social, emotional, and cognitive development of all children, concepts of friendship, and social intelligence, we can better understand the differentiated social needs of highly gifted children, and perhaps, make educated decisions in providing for these needs.

   Dr. Deborah Shictman is a professional social worker who has worked with foster children, school children and parents of gifted and gifted learning disabled children.  She is currently a co-director of Best Beginnings, an intervention/research infant development program addressing children who are economically disadvantaged, culturally diverse, and at-risk for academic failure.  She conducts workshops for parents of gifted children at Hofstra University. 

 

The Many Faces of the Highly Gifted And Individual Differences

 

Raymond H. Swassing, Ed.D

 

   Individual differences express the complexity of the profoundly gifted, yet we are shifting from human complexity to curriculum complexity as the basis for their education.  This session will be a discussion of individual differences and complexity of the profoundly gifted.  The session will involve lecture/discussion and audience participation.

   Dr. Raymond H. Swassing is Associate Professor Emeritus in the College of Education at The Ohio State University where he taught and advised Master’s and Doctoral students in gifted education.  Currently he is Executive Editor of the OAGC Review and author of several publications including Teaching through Modality Strengths: Concepts and Practices; and editor of Teaching Gifted Children and Adolescents. 

 

The Problem Of Pain

 

Stephanie Tolan

 

   We don't like pain.  We do almost anything to avoid it.  But one of the fundamental truths of life in a highly to profoundly gifted family is that pain comes with the territory. It is painful for children to feel isolated, painful to have their intense needs ignored or dismissed.  It is painful for us as parents to watch our children in pain, especially pain that cannot be readily alleviated.  And it is painful to relive the pain of our own childhoods.  This session will deal with coming to terms with pain and discovering ways to help our children and ourselves move through it and out the other side, gaining strength and important strategies for living in the process.

   Stephanie Tolan is an award-winning author of novels and plays for children and young adults.  She also writes and speaks about the needs of the gifted.  Co-author of Guiding the Gifted Child, a contributing editor of Roeper Review, past columnist for Understanding Our Gifted, and a consultant to parents of highly gifted children.

                                               

PANELS - SATURDAY 4 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.

 

Showing Our Stuff

 

Hilary Cohen and Natalie Cohen and Friends

 

   Your highly gifted children may demonstrate extreme sensitivity – so does Lorelei.  Her delicacy prevents her from doing simple chores:  washing dishes gives her a rash, and spinning chaps her hands.  But she is so sensitive she can detect a sprig of parsley hidden in a floral bouquet, and a missing thread in a massive tapestry.  Alternately coddled and despised by those around her, Lorelei must learn to develop and apply her talents to become a happy, contributing member of her community.  See our children perform a one-act version of “The Princess Test,” Gail Carson Levine’s re-telling of the classic story of the princess and the pea, written by eleven-year-old Natalie Cohen, and staged by our kids.

   Hilary Cohen is an experienced healthcare lawyer with over 20 years experience serving physicians and other healthcare providers throughout the country from her office in Los Angeles County.  As the mother of Natalie, a profoundly gifted young woman, by necessity she has had to become an expert on the highly gifted. 

   Natalie Cohen, a Davidson Young Scholar will be eleven just before the Hollingworth Conference.  She left school at age nine after having been invited to skip fifth grade and attend a local preparatory school.  She is homeschooled and considers herself “mostly” a seventh grader.  She is an experienced stage actress and singer.

 

Twice Special: Gifted Children with Special Needs

 

Panel:  Benjamin Cyr, Jill Harper Greeley, Kiesa Kay,

Annette Revel Sheely, M.A., and Meredith Warshaw

 

   Creative, brilliant thinkers sometimes flounder in traditional school settings.  Many highly gifted children have other special needs: learning disabilities, ADHD, Asperger’s syndrome, or other neurological problems.  These children’s abilities to compensate often mean they don’t receive supports that would enable them to flourish in school and realize their dreams.  Linda Kreger Silverman, director of the Gifted Development Center, has estimated that thirty percent of gifted children have some form of special need.  A highly gifted child with age-level skills in one area is not likely to be identified as having special needs, leading to frustration and distress.  Understanding these learners can challenge even the experienced individual.  This panel discussion will address the important issues of identification, modifications, and support for twice exceptional learners.  This panel includes a twice-special student, mothers, and professionals with experience in a variety of setting.  With support, twice-special students can keep their self-esteem and flourish.

   Benjamin Cyr is a gifted/special needs high school student.

   Jill Harper Greeley is an elementary school teacher providing gifted and enrichment services in New Hampshire and is pursuing a masters degree in school administration.  She is the mother of three gifted/special needs children.

   Kiesa Kay is the mother of two gifted/special needs children and editor of the book Uniquely Gifted.

   Annette Revel Sheely, M.A. does assessments and counseling at the Gifted and Development Center in Denver, Colorado and has a counseling practice in Boulder.

   Meredith Warshaw is the mother of a gifted/special needs child and co-founder/co-listowner of the GT-Special email list for families with gifted/special needs children.  

 

"Integrating the Mind, Body, Spirit, Heart and Social

Self of the Profoundly Gifted Child"

 

James Davis, M.A., Elizabeth Stork, M.A., Michael Piechowski, Ph.D.,

Patricia Gatto-Walden, Ph.D.

                                   

   This panel will discuss the importance of understanding profoundly gifted youth more holistically -  in ways that go beyond their advanced mental capacities.  The integration of all aspects of the “self” can lead to greater fulfillment in their adult lives.  The discussion will focus on ways in which individuals can recognize, accept, listen, respect, and honor their special gifts.  The panel will conclude with a discussion of a proposed program to assist parents in developing the skills necessary to meet the unique challenges of raising a profoundly gifted child, as well as the provision of individual assistance for children to learn strategies and skills for coping with and expressing their unique gifts.

   James Davis, M.A. Director of external relations, chief financial officer and secretary of the Institute for Educational Advancement, and has nearly 30 years of experience in education.  He is also Founder and President of The Davis Group Ltd., an international educational consulting firm. 

   Elizabeth Stork, M.A. is President of the Institute for Educational Advancement, a non-profit organization dedicated to serving the needs of highly gifted youth.  For over 19 years she has been an educator, researcher and administrator of educational programs. 

   Dr. Michael Piechowski has written extensively on the developmental potential of the gifted and on advanced development.  His major focus at present is spiritual giftedness, which grew from his study of emotional giftedness, in particular that of resilient survivors of abuse.

   Dr. Patricia Gatto-Walden is a clinical psychologist specializing in work with gifted individuals of all ages.  The essence of her work is to help others learn ways to listen, respect, and honor their deepest wisdom.

 

Homeschooling Highly and Profoundly Gifted Children

 

Kathleen Julicher, Moderator

 

   This dialogue session features several families homeschooling highly gifted and profoundly gifted children in various ways, for widely varying reasons. These families will briefly share their experiences and expertise, followed by an opportunity for audience questions, participation, and discussion!

 

Parenting Highly & Profoundly Gifted Children

 

Parenting extremely gifted children has its own set of challenges, frustrations, and joys. Join a panel of parents of extremely gifted children from all over the country to explore some of the unique parenting issues you face as the parent of a highly, exceptionally, or profoundly gifted child.  Come prepared to share your own questions, concerns, and experiences.

 

Public and Private School Programs For the Highly Gifted

 

Christine Neville, Ed.D. Moderator

 

   This session features a panel of public and private school teachers, coordinators, and administrators of many kinds of programs for highly gifted children from all over the country.  Panelists will discuss the development of many different kinds of conventional schooling options for highly and profoundly gifted students.  Regular classroom approaches, self-contained gifted classes, magnet schools, pullout classes, and other alternatives for highly gifted students in both public and private schools will be featured.  Panel members will share program and educational approaches that work for this population in today's schools.

 

Testing and Assessment

 

  A panel of distinguished psychologists and psychological examiners will be featured, representing the leading centers across the country which specialize in the assessment of extreme giftedness. This dialogue session will address current issues in assessment of highly and profoundly gifted children and adolescents.

 

BANQUET AND AWARDS CEREMONY   SALON E

6:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

 

SUNDAY SESSIONS

                       

8:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.

Breakfast at Stephanie's

Afterwards, You're a Genius:  On Being Too Far Out – Stephanie Tolan

 

   The highly and profoundly gifted can take humanity to new realms, providing new ideas, inventions, and insights.  But original thinking comes with a price.  Before the new has been proven, the innovator is likely to be considered crazy, deluded, "too far out."  Only "afterwards," sometimes posthumously, does the innovator become a "genius" in the eyes of the world.  Enormous courage is needed to follow one's mind over the edge of the known -- it is a critical task for parents to help their children develop that courage.

   Stephanie Tolan is an award-winning author of novels and plays for children and young adults.  She also writes and speaks about the needs of the gifted.  Co-author of Guiding the Gifted Child, a contributing editor of Roeper Review, past columnist for Understanding Our Gifted, and a consultant to parents of highly gifted children.

 

FOUNDER'S ADDRESS - 9:30 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

           

Looking Forward, Looking Back:  A Tale of Two Centuries

 

Kathi Kearney

 

   Using photographs and other archival materials, Kathi will introduce the major events and people that have advanced our knowledge and support of extreme giftedness in the 20th century, then project the advances – and the steps backward -- we may see in the 21st century. The audience will assist during an interactive conclusion to the session.

   Kathi Kearney is Founder of the Hollingworth Center for Highly Gifted Children, a Maine-based national resource and support network for highly gifted children and their families, schools and communities.  She is an independent educational consultant in gifted education and works with homeschooling families in many capacities.  She is completing her doctorate in Education of the Gifted at Teachers College, Columbia University. 

 

10:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

 

Homeschooling Teens:  Putting Your Child In Charge Of His Education

 

Kathryn M. Finn, B.A.

 

   Teens are wonderful people, and they want so much to be adults.  They still need the Garden of Childhood.  They also need to be welcomed into the Wide World. Homeschooling changes in the teen years.  It is no longer enough to provide a safe space and feed them fundamentals.  Especially for the gifted child, the fundamentals are owned.  The teen needs to envision himself as a full member of the world community.  In order to do so, they must discover their area of passion and find standing in that community.  We need to find adult members of that community who will welcome the young person in.  Some teens know exactly where they are going.  Others are pulled in different directions.  And some few still have no clue.  The Garden of Childhood must have a swinging gate, allowing safe retreat to be combined with exploration of the wide world at the choice of the child.  This session suggests strategies for putting a swinging gate on the Garden will be explored.

   Kathryn M. Finn, B.A., the mother of five children, has been accepted as a Masters candidate in gifted education at the College of William and Mary.  She is Director for Creative Education Programs for Families of the Talented and Gifted, a large internet-based support and information network for families with gifted children and others interested in their welfare.

 

Facing Reality - The Hope, Promise, Frustration, and Joy

of Serving Highly and Profoundly Gifted Students in a Gifted School

 

Barbara Mitchell Hutton, M.B.A. and Nicci Clark, M.S.

 

   Translate asynchronous development, spiritual giftedness, learning style, introversion/ extroversion, parent needs, student interest, differentiated curriculum, the Columbus Group definition of giftedness, "overexcitabilities", twice exceptional/LD, funding constraints and jammed copy machines into reality for students. Is it possible for teachers to meet the sometimes conflicting expectations of parents, students, administrators, and governing boards? Achieving balance for all constituents is an ongoing challenge. Since 1990, Rocky Mountain School for the Gifted and Creative in Boulder, Colorado has evolved in its understanding of gifted children, their inner lives, and the hopes and fears of parents. Our unique Curriculum: Challenge!, individual learning plans, student grouping, and classroom structure are designed to support the RMS mission to "challenge, support, and inspire gifted individuals!" In this interactive workshop we will share our philosophy, curriculum, and the classroom tools that have contributed to RMS becoming a magnet for highly and profoundly gifted students and their families.

   Barbara Mitchell-Hutton, M.B.A. is Director and co-founder of Rocky Mountain School for the Gifted and Creative in Boulder, Colorado.  She also serves as President of the Board of Directors.  In 1990, motivated by the needs of a two year old highly gifted daughter, Barbara began the process of finding a school that would meet her needs.  When it became clear that existing public and private schools were not prepared to provide a supportive environment for a young gifted girl, she laid the groundwork for establishing Rocky Mountain School.

   Nicci Clark, M.S. is Master Teacher and Curriculum Coordinator of Rocky Mountain School for the Gifted and Creative in Boulder, Colorado.  As the first teacher at RMS she guided the development of curriculum and provided leadership for the faculty as the school evolved since 1991.

 

Black Sky Bright Star:

The Highly Gifted and Depression

 

P. Susan Jackson, M.A., R.C.C.

 

   "And then the black comes rolling in again...the thoughts of death. . .and I alone in it. . ."  The results of an extensive research study on the nature, extent and meaning of depressive states for the highly gifted adolescent will be presented. The study revealed a complex set of variables that underpin the development of depressive states differing in type and severity.  Counselors, teachers and parents will be provided with perspectives on appropriate counseling and developmental scaffolding as well as strategies to support highly gifted young people

   P. Susan Jackson, M.A., R.C.C. is a poet, mother of two exceptional children, a counseling psychologist, teacher, consultant, administrator, and researcher specializing in the developmental, educational and therapeutic needs of gifted persons.  Her particular interest and expertise is the highly gifted population in which she has been immersed in study and practice for ten years. 

 

“Etiquette And Ethics,” Research, & Extreme Giftedness:

Re-Examining the Foundations in the Information Age

 

Kathi Kearney and Stephanie Tolan

 

   Seventy years ago, Hollingworth struggled with the question of research “etiquette and ethics” in the study of profoundly gifted children.  These children were easily recognized, and their extreme developmental asynchrony raised unique research issues, vulnerabilities, and questions unknown in other areas of psychology. Hollingworth developed rudimentary principles and rationales for the ethical choices regarding her research. Today, her principles remain valid, but the challenges of the Information Age and the advent of the Internet raise unprecedented concerns for the profoundly gifted. This presentation will re-examine the conceptual foundations of Hollingworth’s research ethics from perspectives she never could have foreseen 70 years ago -- the instantaneous global transfer of information, the ubiquitous presence of the media in American life, the end of privacy, and issues of intellectual property.

   Kathi Kearney is Founder of the Hollingworth Center for Highly Gifted Children, a volunteer  national resource and support network for highly gifted children and their families, schools and communities.  She is an independent educational consultant in gifted education and works with homeschooling families in many capacities.  She is completing her doctorate in Education of the Gifted at Teachers College, Columbia University.

   Stephanie Tolan is an award-winning author of novels and plays for children and young adults.  She also writes and speaks about the needs of the gifted and co-author of Guiding the Gifted Child, a contributing editor of Roeper Review, past columnist for Understanding Our Gifted, and a consultant to parents of highly gifted children.

 

Ideas For Organizing Students’ Work

 

Joyce Laine, B.A. and Becky Valdez, B.A.

 

   This will be an interactive session providing practical ideas for organizing assignments and materials.  Examples for viewing and explanations on how to utilize them; along with suggestions for making your own materials at home will be discussed.  Participants will be encouraged to contribute some successful strategies that they have implemented.  These will be collected and discussed with the group.  A compilation of these ideas will be sent by e-mail to those in the group that wish to receive them.  This presentation provides parents with practical things that they can do that don't require a lot of money.

   Joyce Laine, B.A. is presently a homeschooling mother of two very special children.  Teaching, reading and learning more about dealing with the different needs of highly and profoundly gifted children has taken a lot of time during the past five years. Children are really wonderful teachers, and Joyce has learned a lot from them through the years.

   Becky Valdez, B.A. is homeschool Mom to a 7 year old.  Becky is a designer and decorative painter of children’s furniture – Rebecca Valdez Designs.   

 

Parent Support Group

 

Nancy Minkoff, M.S. and Shirley Rand

 

   Nancy Minkoff and Shirley Rand will be facilitating parent support group discussions.  Both Nancy and Shirley are parents of profoundly gifted individuals who are now adults, and thus have been through many of the trials involved in the challenge of parenting these children.  Shirley’s son is twice exceptional, providing her with additional expertise and insights.  Parents may come and discuss their own situations in a safe, non-confrontational, understanding environment, and can gain not only from the expertise of Nancy and Shirley, but also from their discussions with each other.  These two parents conducted support groups at last year’s conference and felt a number of parents benefited.

   Nancy Minkoff, M.S. holds degrees in Psychology and Exceptionality.  She is the mother of two adult profoundly gifted children and is a founding member of The Hollingworth Center for Highly Gifted Children.

   Shirley Rand is the Mother of five twice-exceptional children and has developed many skills necessary in dealing with schools, highly gifted children with special needs, and the legislature.  She is also a founding member of The Hollingworth Center for Highly Gifted Children. 

 

Advocating for Your Highly Gifted Child – How to work (with?) the System

 

Cathy Russell

 

   This presentation and discussion will be an extension of the article “Preparing and Holding an Effective School Meeting” in the Spring/Summer 1999 issue of Highly Gifted Children.  It is geared to parents who are trying to create appropriate educational experiences for their children within a school system.  We will talk about common obstacles and strategies for overcoming them.  Ideas are drawn from my personal experience with our children, and from working with other local parents.  Since participants will come from schools with different cultures and philosophies, I hope that the discussion will help broaden the arsenal of tools parents can use as they advocate for their own children.

   Cathy Russell has two highly gifted children.  Her family has gotten a variety of accommodations within the public school, and they have also homeschooled.  She started and leads a support group for parents of gifted children in her local school district.

 

Modes of Non-Linear Thinking

 

Josh Shaine

 

   “There are two kinds of people in the world; Linear and Non-Linear.”  Does that description sound familiar to you?  That is the view of the world held by mostly Linear Thinkers.  You are one of us or you are not one of us.  Non-linear thinking is merely a catch-all category for many different approaches to examination and expression of ideas and concepts.  These approaches can have so little in common that to refer to them with a common descriptor is laughable.  In this presentation, we will explore different sorts of ‘non-linear’ thinking, including Relational, Gestalt, and Physical/Spatial modes.  We will compare these with Silverman’s Visual-Spatial/Auditory-Sequential dichotomy, Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences, and the Myers-Briggs Type Inventory.  We will also discuss ways to nurture people whose thoughts follow these less common paths.

     Josh Shaine has been working with gifted and talented children for more than twenty years.  During that time he has served as Director or MIT’s High School Studies program; Headmaster of Massachusetts Academy, a private school for gifted 7th-12th grade students; and is currently a teacher/tutor for a variety of families, private schools, and public school systems.  He also serves on the board of the Massachusetts Association for Advancement of Individual Potential and Kids’ College.

 

LUNCH 11:45 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.  Pre-registered Lunches

 Pick up lunches in registration area.

AFTERNOON 1:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.

           

Teach Mathematics Not Arithmetic!  Critical For Highly And Profoundly Gifted Children, K-12

 

Douglas G. Frank, Ph.D.

 

   The unfortunate teaching of arithmetic to highly and profoundly gifted children can repress or extinguish natural mathematical ability.  When children reach middle and high school grades after a steady diet of arithmetic, there is a huge amount of unlearning and relearning to be accomplished.  Brilliant math students could even believe that they cannot do math because they have never experienced it.

   Dr. Douglas G. Frank teaches science and mathematics at The Schilling School for Gifted Children in Cincinnati, Ohio and President of ADAM Instrument Company.

 

Asynchrony, Homeschooling, and a Classical Education

 

Kathleen Julicher

 

   Many parents of extremely gifted children choose homeschooling as an option, and the classical education approach is often selected.  Yet as parents of highly and profoundly gifted children know, these children do not proceed evenly along on the path to adulthood.  Instead, maturing in irregular bursts, they challenge the pacing of a classical education designed for normal children.  According to classical educators, a young person proceeds through several stages; three of which are the grammar stage, the dialectic stage, and the rhetorical stage.  A highly gifted child may continue learning data at a high rate (the grammar stage) while already beginning to challenge that data as he moves into the dialectic stage.  Or, a child may begin to systematically present his ideas using excellent rhetoric while still pursuing the argumentative behavior of the dialectic stage.  While these asynchronies can be disconcerting to the home educator of highly and profoundly gifted children, they do offer some unusual opportunities.  This workshop will explore both the phenomenon of asynchrony in the context of classical education, and some of the unusual opportunities offered by the classical approach.

   Kathleen Julicher, and her husband are the founders of Castle Heights Press, publishers of science manuals for home and small school use.  She is also the principal of Westbridge Academy, the only satellite school for gifted homeschoolers. 

 

Through Their Eyes: The Exceptionally Gifted Child

 

Deirdre V. Lovecky, Ph.D.

 

   Exceptionally gifted children conceptualize ideas in many different ways.  Some see the world in terms of math and numbers. Some fold things and see the world as a spatial place that can be manipulated in various dimensions.  Others play with language, malign images for others, using words precisely, and endeavoring to forge links to other languages. Some use pattern making to understand the world. Other exceptionally gifted children are seekers, making empathic links to the transcendent, to their own creative spirits, to other people. They can be exceptionally compassionate or seekers of truth. This presentation attempts to delineate what makes the mind unique and how the world looks to the child in question, that is, what is the defining characteristic of this kind of mind, how does it generate a world view, and what are its gifts and limitations. This is a work in progress. Audience discussion of the ideas presented will be appreciated.

   Dr. Deirdre Lovecky has written the article “Gifted Children with AD/HD” which can be accessed through the ERIC Clearing House at http://ericec.org/fact/lovecky.hmt.  She is a clinical child psychologist who specializes in the assessment and treatment of gifted children.  She is especially interested in the needs of exceptionally and profoundly gifted children, those with dual exceptionalities such as AD/HD or Asperger’s Syndrome and in learning differences.  She has a private practice in Providence, RI.  Her website is www.grcne.com

 

Integrating Self And Society Or Living A Stifled Life

 

Annemarie Roeper, Ed.D. and Betty Meckstroth, Ed.D.

 

   As a person's abilities increase high above the norm, so does their probability of experiencing dissonance from their society. Our session will explore how gifted people might limit or annihilate their Selves to accommodate to their groups, alienate themselves from others, or actualize and integrate their Selves. Distinguishing differences between accomplishments and personal identity will be examined.  Since gifted people often find themselves in a limited community of compatible peers, ways to appreciate and deepen the value of interpersonal relationships will be explored. We will explore the process of connecting and cooperating and discuss ways to help us and our children towards successful integration.  A goal of this session is to help ourselves and our children wisely discern who they are and how their Self relates to their personal realm, including their place in community, society, and their spiritually.  There will be ample participation by the attendees who will co-create this presentation. 

   Dr. Annemarie Roeper is an educational consultant with more than 50 years experience specializing in educational needs of gifted children and their families.  She sees herself as an advocate for children and considers her most important contribution her concept of Self Actualization and Interdependence (SAI), a basis for allowing the natural growth of children.  She is editor of the Roeper Review, a national journal on gifted child education and has published hundreds of articles on giftedness.  She has received many awards and honors for her work. 

   Betty Meckstroth, M. Ed. has worked with families of gifted children and focused on their social and emotional needs since 1979.  She coordinated development of Supporting Emotional Needs of Gifted Children and Adults program (SENG).  She is a co-author of Teaching Young Gifted Children in the Regular Classroom and Guiding the Gifted Child:  A Practical Source for Parents and Teachers, awarded “Best Book” by the American Psychological Association and published in four languages.  

 

The Whys And Wherefores of Starting A School for Gifted Children

 

Sandra and Ronald Schilling

 

   These two presenters share the nitty-gritty business details of starting a special private school for gifted children.  Although differences exist from state to state, the basics of being incorporated, obtaining tax-exempt status, securing funding, locating a site, and finding teachers and students will be discussed.

   Sandra and Ronald Schilling operate The Schilling School for Gifted Children in Cincinnati, Ohio.

 

Perfectionism – International Case Studies With Highly Gifted Adolescents

 

Patricia Schuler, Ph.D.

 

   Perfectionism is considered a hallmark characteristic of many highly gifted adolescents.  This session will examine the findings of international case studies of perfectionism in highly gifted adolescents.  Their perceptions of their perfectionism, the influences on and the consequences of their perfectionistic behaviors in the context of their senior high schools and their cultures, will be presented.  Among the countries participating in this quantitative and qualitative research project are: France, Switzerland, Russia, Poland, Slovenia, and the United States.

   Dr. Patricia Schuler is a counselor and educational consultant with Creative Insights, Rensselaer, New York.  She prepared her doctoral dissertation on “Perfectionism in Gifted Adolescents.” 

 

Case Studies Of Twice Exceptional Students:  Stories Of Successful Strategies

 

Brooke Walker

 

   Twice-exceptional students, those students who are both highly gifted and have some sort of disability, have much to offer themselves and society.  Beethoven, Helen Keller, Vincent Van Gogh, Albert Einstein, and Thomas Edison are all examples of highly gifted individuals who also had disabilities.  This workshop will provide case studies of highly gifted students who also have some type of disability.  Successful identification methods and programming strategies will be explained and discussed.

   Dr. Brooke Walker has experience working with gifted children ages three through twelve and has been involved in the development of appropriate curriculum and instructional strategies for these age groups.

 

Different Minds

 

P. Susan Jackson, M.A., Maddi Wallach, M.A., R.C.C. and Bailey Whiteside

 

   There are many highly and profoundly gifted children who can function reasonably well in traditional school settings, if they are allowed to advance at an accelerated speed, but for some, this does not help at all.  This workshop will explore what motivates and works for children who are not driven by mastery and/or organization and do not operate in a concrete sequential manner.  We will explore the motives and methods of children driven by: creativity; ethical imperatives; invention; connection and/or meaning.  We will explore effective ways to work with these students, who like Einstein and Picasso had extreme difficulty functioning in school because they had qualitatively different minds

   P. Susan Jackson, M.A., R.C.C. is a poet, mother of two exceptional children, a counseling psychologist, teacher, consultant, administrator and researcher specializing in the developmental, educational and therapeutic needs of gifted persons.  Her particular interest and expertise is the highly gifted population in which she has been immersed in study and practice for ten years. 

   Maddi Wallach, M.A. holds her B.A. in Education and Dance Movement Education with her M.A. in Counseling Psychology and Expressive Arts Therapies.  She has worked with highly gifted children and adults as an educator and a therapist, and has two highly gifted children. 

   Bailey Whiteside will be attending college next year at age 16, after having skipped first grade and fifth grade.  She plans to become an actress and is also interested in psychology and biology.

 

KEYNOTE

 2:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.

 

Being and Becoming:

The Self-Emergent of the Highly Gifted Person

 

P. Susan Jackson, MA, R.C.C.

 

   What is it to BE a Highly Gifted Person: to have extraordinary ability, to have a deep need for knowledge and a vital capacity for complex experiencing, to know a rich capacity for awe?  What is it to BECOME as a Highly Gifted person: to be vitally aware, to absorb, to comprehend, to imagine, to adapt, to grow, to want, to create, to challenge, to transform and to exist as an extraordinary, enduring, unrepeatable, emergent being?  How does this extraordinary human being emerge?  What are the core determinants of growth and development for our highly gifted children?  How can we, as parents and educators, enable that central ordering principle, the hidden coherence of each being -- the Self -- to take shape in the world?  What is the role of these manifest gifts in the interplay between the children, their growth and their place in the human mosaic?  A highly gifted person takes its form in a multiplicity of humanity, unfolding in a glorious spectrum of gifts, likely immeasurable.  This presentation introduces the mathematical prodigy and chess champion, the violin virtuoso, the financier, the deep spiritual seeker, the poet. and the profoundly gifted artist.  Like still waters, the gifted child runs deep . . . the closer a gifted child runs to being a genius, the more his creative capacity acts like a personality far in advance of his years, like a divine daemon...  like a calling to something greater, something infinite.  Each of our highly gifted children responds to this calling, at some level, in some way. Each needs the grace of true communion to decipher the nature of this hidden coherence.  Each has a way to be and a way to

become . . .

 

Such are the hours toward which we wend

and toward such hours wend for years and years;

then suddenly a listener is found-

and all words have meaning.

Rilke

 

   P. Susan Jackson, M.A., R.C.C. is a poet, mother of two exceptional children, a Counseling Psychologist, teacher, consultant, administrator and researcher specializing in the developmental, educational and therapeutic needs of gifted persons.  Her particular interest and expertise is the highly gifted population in which she has been immersed in study and practice for ten years.

 

ANNUAL MEETING – 4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.  

 

THE HOLLINGWORTH CENTER FOR HIGHLY GIFTED CHILDREN

 

CHILDREN WORKSHOPS – SALONS A, B, C & H

These begin 5 minutes before and end 5 minutes after adult workshops

 

 

 

YOUNG ADULTS WORKSHOPS – SUITE 639

 

        

ROOM

PRESENTER

TITLE OF SESSION

 

 

FRIDAY SESSIONS:

 

 

INTRODUCTION - 8:30 - 9:15 a.m.

Salon G

Neville

Wake Up America!  Your Highly Gifted Students are Fleeing Public Schools

 

 

MORNING 9:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Salon F

Davis

Serving PG Students in the Schools - The Optimal Match Philosophy in Action

Minuteman

Frank

College Level Integrated Science for HG High School Students Teach Mathematics NOT Arithmetic!

Salon G

Neville

The Critical Peer Group; Critical Needs for Depth in Literature and Writing 

Salon H

Quilty-Dunn

Current Best Practices in Highly Gifted Pedagogy

Charles River East

 

LUNCH 11:45 p.m. - 1:00 p.m

 

 

AFTERNOON 1:00 - 3:45 p.m.

Salon G

Chapman

Open Doors to Education- combined with Howard

Salon G

Howard

Educational Needs for the PG Child; Practical Ways the School Can Help

Salon F

Fiedler

Highly Gifted:  Multiple Insights from Multiple Perspectives

Minuteman

Jackson

Black Sky Bright Star - The Highly Gifted and Depression

Salon H

Kay

Twice Special: Gifted Children with Special Needs

 

 

SATURDAY SESSIONS:  9:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

Lexington

Blackburn.

Meeting the Needs of Exceptionally Gifted Students In and Out of the Classroom

Old Meeting House

Carlton

Living With Dual Identities:  A Model for Connected Systems and Supports…

Salon F

Harris

Curriculum Development for the Exceptionally and Profoundly Gifted

Salon E

Kearney

Understanding H and P Gifted Children:  A Primer for First-Time Conf. Participants

Salon G

Kottmeyer

Many Internet Resources for Highly Gifted Children

Minuteman

Levi

How to bring about state and national change for the most gifted students (Grass Roots Mothers)

Charles River East

Lovance

Beyond The Label

Charles River West

Rivers

Multi-age, Multi-level Magnet Programming for Extremely HG Elemen/Middle School Students

 

 

KEYNOTE 10:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Salon E

Gross

From "The Saddest Sound" to the D Major Chord: How Radical Acceleration Can Liberate H G Stud.

Registration Area

 

LUNCH 11:45 p.m. - 1:00 p.m. Registration Area for pre-paid lunches

 

 

SATURDAY 1:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.

Salon E

Chapman

Open Doors to Education

Salon F

Frank

College Level Integrated Science for Highly Gifted High School Students

Salon G

Julicher

The "Tech Kids": Who are They and How do We Educate Them

Old Meeting House

Howard

Educational Needs for the Profoundly Gifted Child; Practical Ways the School Can Help

Lexington

Lovecky

Highly Gifted Children with AD/HD

Charles River East

Meckstroth

INFP Type Influences on Highly Gifted People

Charles River West

Neville

The Critical Peer Group

Minuteman

von Károlyi

Interaction of Gifted & Learning Disorders: Discuss. of Self-Concept and Learning Style

 

 

SATURDAY 2:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.

Old Meeting House

Harris

Activating Ability Grouping:  Batteries Not Included

Charles River East

Hutton

The Great Juggling Act - Creating the "Perfect" School for the H and P Gifted Student

Salon G

Minkoff

Parent Support Group

Salon F

Morse

Exploring Individual Capacities of Highly Gifted Children

Charles River West

Shictman

Socialization in Highly Gifted Children:  Strive to be "All Around" or "Keep to Your Own Kind"

Minuteman

Swassing

The Many Faces of the Highly Gifted and Individual Differences

Salon E

Tolan

The Problem of Pain

Lexington

Shaine

Underachievement among the Highly Gifted

 

 

PANELS - SATURDAY 4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.

Salon E

Cohen

Showing Our Stuff

Salon G

Davis

"Integrating the Mind, Body, Spirit, Heart and Social Self of the Profoundly Gifted Child"

Salon F

Kay

Twice Special:  Gifted Children with Special Needs

Lexington

Julicher

Homeschooling Highly and Profoundly Gifted Children

Old Meeting House

Neville

Public and Private School Programs For the Highly Gifted

Charles River East

 

Parenting Dialogue Session

Charles River West

 

Testing and Assessment

Salon E

 

BANQUET 6:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

 

 

 

 

 

SUNDAY SESSIONS:  8:00a.m.  - 9:15 a.m.

Salon E

Tolan

Breakfast at Stephanie’s - Afterwards, You're a Genius:  On Being Too Far Out

 

 

FOUNDER'S ADDRESS - 9:30 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

Salon E

Kearney

Looking Forward, Looking Back:  A Tale of Two Centuries

 

 

SUNDAY 10:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Charles River West

Finn

Homeschooling Teens:  Putting your Child in Charge of His Education

Merry Go Round

Hutton

Facing Reality - The Hope, Promise, Frustration, and Joy of Serving H&P Gifted Students in a Gifted School

Salon E

Jackson

Black Sky Bright Star - The Highly Gifted and Depression

Charles River East

Kearney

"Etiquette and Ethics," Research, & Extreme Giftedness: Re-Examining Foundations in Information Age

Norumbega

Laine

Ideas for Organizing Students' Work

Minuteman

Minkoff

Parent Support Group

Salon D

Shaine

Modes of Non-Linear Thinking

Old Meeting House

Russell

Advocating for Your Highly Gifted Child - How to work (with?) the system

Registration Area

 

LUNCH 11:45 p.m. - 1:00 p.m. Registration Area for pre-paid lunches

 

 

AFTERNOON 1:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.

Charles River West

Frank

Teach Mathematics NOT Arithmetic!  Critical for H and P Gifted Children, K-12

Old Meeting House

Julicher

Asynchrony and a Classical Education

Salon E

Lovecky.

Through Their Eyes:  The Exceptionally Gifted Child

Charles River East

Roeper

Integrating Self and Society or Living a Stifled Life

Merry Go Round

Schilling

The Whys and Wherefores of Starting a School for Gifted Children

Minuteman

Schuler

Perfectionism - International Case Studies with Highly Gifted Adolescents

Norumbega

Walker

Case Studies of Twice Exceptional Students: Stories of Successful Strategies

Salon D

Wallach

Different Minds

 

 

KEYNOTE 2:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.

Salon E

Jackson

Being and Becoming: The Self-Emergent of the Highly Gifted Person

Salon E

 

ANNUAL MEETING 4:00 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.